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Sep 30 2022 17:29

124.70 SEK4.00

/frontend/shared/header/languagechooser

Sep 30 2022 17:29

124.70 SEK4.00

Definitions

Key performance indicator according to IFRS

Earnings per share, SEK: Profit for the period attributable to Parent company shareholders to average number of shares outstanding, based on a rolling twelve-month calculation.

 

Key performance indicators not defined according to IFRS

Adjusted Free Cash Flow: Cash flow from operations and cash flow from investments, excluding company acquisitions/divestments.

Adjusted Net debt: Net debt excluding liabilities related to leasing.

Adjusted operating margin: Adjusted operating profit expressed as a percentage of net sales.

Adjusted operating profit: Operating profit adjusted for one-off items and restructuring costs when the amount is significant in size.

Cash flow from operating activities per share, SEK: Cash flow from operating activities to number of shares outstanding at the end of the period.

Equity/asset ratio: Shareholders’ equity including non-controlling interests, expressed as a percentage of total assets.

Free Cash Flow: Cash flow from operations and cash flow from investments.

Interest coverage ratio, times: Earnings before tax plus interest expense to interest expense.

Investments in intangible assets and tangible fixed assets: Investments excluding acquisitions and divestments of companies.

Net debt: Interest-bearing provisions and liabilities less interest-bearing assets and cash equivalents.

NET debt/EBITDA: Average net debt in relation to EBITDA, excluding one-off items and restructuring costs, based on a rolling twelve-month calculation.

Net debt/equity ratio: Net debt to shareholders’ equity including non-controlling interests.

One-off items and restructuring costs: Items not included in the ordinary business transactions and when each amount is significant in size and therefore has an effect on the profit or loss and key performance indicators, are classified as one-off items and restructuring costs.

Operating margin: Operating profit expressed as a percentage of net sales.

Operating profit: Profit before financial items and tax.

Operating profit before depreciation/amortisation - EBITDA: Operating profit before planned depreciation/amortisation.

Organic growth: Change in sales adjusted for currency effects as well as acquisitions and divestments compared with the same period of the previous year.

Profit margin: Earnings before tax expressed as a percentage of net sales.

Return on capital employed: Earnings before tax after adding back financial expenses based on a rolling twelve-month calculation, expressed as a percentage of average capital employed1). Capital employed refers to total assets less non-interest-bearing provisions and liabilities.

Return on shareholders’ equity: Profit for the period attributable to Parent company shareholders based on a rolling twelve-month calculation, expressed as a percentage of average shareholders’ equity1) attributable to Parent company shareholders.

Shareholders’ equity per share, SEK: Shareholders’ equity attributable to Parent company shareholders to number of shares.

1) Average capital is based on the quarterly value. outstanding at the end of the period.

Did you know that we breathe an entire tanker truck of air in a day?

We eat about 1 kg of food a day, drink 1-3 l of water and we breathe about 15 kilos a day. This corresponds to 12,000 liters of air or 20 cubic meters, as much as a full tanker truck.

Many of us are quite conscious about what we choose to eat and drink. But do you often think about the air you breathe? In the UK, we spend around 90% of our time indoors and often the air indoors is more polluted than outdoors. When it comes to children, they are more sensitive and at risk of higher exposure because they eat, drink and breathe more in relation to their body size.

 

Air pollution is a health challenge

If we stay in buildings with poor air quality, we run a higher risk of suffering from asthma and other respiratory diseases. In addition, our cognitive abilities deteriorate, such as e.g. learning and concentration. Therefore, we think it is extremely important that nurseries and schools have good ventilation.

Consider how the room will be used

When planning for ventilation, it is important to think about how the room will be used. For example, in a nursery, you must consider that small children often play on the floor and therefor the air needs to be able to flow all the way down there. It is important to have the right ventilation system and diffuser in the right place for everyone to feel good and be happy!